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31 July 2010

Announcing: The Ancestry of Theodore Timothy Judge and Ellen Sheehy Judge

The California Genealogical Society is pleased to announce publication of The Ancestry of Theodore Timothy Judge and Ellen Sheehy Judge: Including the Families of Boland, Roussel, Harman, McMurphy, Kelley, Bohane, Chapin, Freiermuth, Taylor, Moore and Farneman.


Theodore Timothy “Ted” Judge died in Cupertino, California, June 11, 2008. Although neither he nor his late wife Ellen Sheehy Judge left descendants, they shared a mutual interest in family history that they enthusiastically pursued over the years. In his will Ted left legacies to numerous charities and
institutions, including the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley, where he had spent many hours as a student. His bequest required that the administrators of the Judge estate, in conjunction with the Bancroft, arrange for the publication of a Judge and Sheehy genealogy to be distributed to Ted and Ellen’s cousins. CGS contracted to fulfill Ted's request and this book is the result.

The project consumed the society's Research and Look-ups committee for months. Judy Bodycote chaired the committee while Jane Lindsey negotiated the agreement and shepherded the project through to completion. The Research team of Judy Bodycote, Lavinia Schwarz and Pat Smith started work in 2009 with the assistance of Dick Rees and Laura Spurrier. Later Judy Zelver, Lorna Wallace and Barbara Dyer joined the research team. Nancy Peterson assumed the final writing responsibilities and Matt Berry took on the Herculean task of formatting (and re-formatting) the book.

The list of major contributors:
  • Matthew B. Berry - layout, proofing and indexing
  • Judy Bodycote-Thomas - research, charts and photo editing
  • Verne Deubler - proofing
  • Barbara Dyer - research, indexing
  • Jane Hufft - editing, standardization, meetings
  • Jane Lindsey - coordinator
  • Bill O'Neal - maps
  • Nancy Peterson - writing, proofing
  • Richard Rees - research
  • Lavinia Grace Schwarz  - research
  • Pat Smith - research
  • Laura Spurrier - editing, proofing
  • Shirley Thomson - proofing
  • Lorna Wallace - research
  • Judy Zelver - research
Acknowledgment must also be made to those who stepped up to maintain the research and look-ups services ordinarily done by the committee. Verne Deubler took over much of the weekly look-ups work load and Dick Rees, Pam Miller and others helped with research projects.

Copies may be purchased from Lulu.com.

Additional information on many families mentioned in this book has been archived at the California Genealogical Society, 2201 Broadway, Suite LL2, Oakland, California, 94612-3031.

The Ancestry of Theodore Timothy Judge and Ellen Sheehy Judge: Including the Families of Boland, Roussel, Harman, McMurphy, Kelley, Bohane, Chapin, Freiermuth, Taylor, Moore and Farneman
Pub. 2010 by California Genealogical Society
Softbound, 8 1/2 x 11" format, 224 pp. ISBN 978-0-9785694-9-5; LOC 2010929198
Price: $25.00.
 

Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

29 July 2010

Book Launch: Come Celebrate Our New Books!


Wednesday, September 1, 2010
Coffee and cider 10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Program 11:00 a.m.
Refreshments and book browsing 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

California Genealogical Society and Library
2201 Broadway, Suite LL2
Oakland, California 94612

Fall Book Party! You Are Invited! Come Leaf Through the New Publications!

Join us at the society for “An Autumn Celebration of Books” as we launch three significant new titles and celebrate the resurrection of our journal, The California Nugget.

Mighty oaks from little acorns grow and the sturdiest family trees are rooted in sound research. Our publications will help you find your way through the forest! We are very excited about presenting these new “leaves," and we're proud of these meticulously researched publications that will contribute valuable information and new resources to the genealogical community.

This event heralds the publication of three new titles:
  • San Francisco Probate 1906 - 1942: Register of Actions
  • San Francisco Deaths 1865-1904: Abstracts from Surviving Civil Records
  • The Ancestry of Theodore Timothy Judge and Ellen Sheehy Judge: Including the Families of Boland, Roussel, Harman, McMurphy, Kelley, Bohane, Chapin, Freiermuth, Taylor, Moore and Farneman
We're also asking our member authors with new titles to join the celebration and to be available for questions and books signings. Please email me if you can join the fun!

Update (8/9/2010): Three member authors will be celebrating their books with us.
  • Linda Foster Arden - Letters From the Storm: The Intimate Civil War Letters of Lt. J. A. H. Foster    
  • Ron Arons - WANTED! U.S. Criminal Records 
  • James Smith - The California Snatch Racket: Kidnappings During the Prohibition and Depression Eras

Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

28 July 2010

Wordless Wednesday

Tech Workshop with Tim Cox
Using Microsoft Word 2007 for Genealogy
Saturday, June 26, 2010







Photographs courtesy of Tim Cox, Oakland, California.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

26 July 2010

Will You Join Us on Thursday Night?

Last Thursday, July 22, 2010, five participants attended the discussion group on French Canadian genealogy. Attendees had varying levels of expertise using French-Canadian records and by the evening's end, everyone had learned something new.




Some members came in to take advantage of the extended open hours at the library – until 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays in July and August. Between her weekday work schedule and weekend family commitments, member Lynn Theuriet rarely gets to visit the library. She was thrilled to be able to grab a few hours of research time and she is looking forward to the remaining five Thursday evenings to catch up on her genealogical pursuits.

Gary Darnstedt planned to attend the French Canadian discussion group but arrived at 9:00 a.m. to get in a full day of research. He spent his day with Dutch ancestral pursuits and worked on French-Canadian in the evening.

This coming Thursday, July 29, 2010, Tom Gesner will be leading a discussion on using NewEnglandAncestors.org – one of the subscription databases available at the library. Won't you join us?

RSVP online and let us know you are coming.

Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

25 July 2010

San Francisco Bay Area Genealogy Calendar: August 2010 Published

August events have been published on the San Francisco Bay Area Genealogy Calendar – a collection of local genealogical society classes, workshops and meetings within a 75 mile radius of San Francisco.

The monthly list of Bay Area genealogy programs continues to grow as more societies submit their items to the calendar.

If you would like your group's events added to the calendar, please email the information by the 20th of each month for publication on the 25th. (Put "SFBA Calendar" in the subject line.)
 

Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

23 July 2010

What You Missed: California's Newspapers with Dr. Henry Snyder

The newspaper is the most important printed source for local history and especially so for genealogists. 
– Dr. Henry Snyder
On Saturday, July 10, 2010, at the CGS July membership meeting, Dr. Henry Snyder presented The California Newspaper: A Genealogical Treasure, What Survives, How to Find and Use It. Henry is a member of CGS and Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California, Riverside.




Dr. Snyder described the national umbrella project, The United States Newspaper Program, managed by the Library of Congress and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Each state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands had a program which spent twenty-five years locating, cataloging, and microfilming newspapers published in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present.




Now retired, Snyder continues to offer assistance to The Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research (CBSR) at the University of California, Riverside, where he was the director of the California Newspaper Project from 1990 through 2009. He and his team scoured the state, chasing down any clues that might lead to a stash of old papers or microfilm. According to their website, "Close to 9,000 California newspapers were inventoried in over 1,400 repositories throughout the state, 1.5 million pages of California newspapers were preserved and made available on microfilm, and 100,000 rolls of negative microfilm rolls are being processed for permanent storage at the UC Regional Library Storage Facilities."




Although the first California newspaper wasn't published until 1846, the state has the third largest number of known titles after New York and Illinois. Papers have been published in thirty-nine different languages in the state, including Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Japanese and Chinese.

The state program has evolved into the California Digital Newspaper Collection. As of today, the collection contains 44,922 issues comprising 396,287 pages and 4,907,047 articles. Approximately 200,000 of these pages can also be accessed through Chronicling America on the Library of Congress website.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

19 July 2010

Member Book - The California Snatch Racket: Kidnappings During the Prohibition and Depression Eras

CGS member James R. Smith is busy promoting his newest book:

The California Snatch Racket: Kidnappings During the Prohibition and Depression Eras
Bringing a dark and forgotten era into vivid life, this fascinating history explores a booming criminal enterprise that was spawned in California in the 1920s and 1930s. Exposing a spree of kidnappings referred to as the “snatch racket,” true accounts of the crimes and the unfortunate victims are revealed. Driven by greed, desperation, or sheer stupidity, this detailed discussion explains that the ransom artists preyed indiscriminately on Hollywood socialites, wealthy heiresses, and even the poor—while each new disappearance brought new headlines and sales to the newspaper companies.
Illustrating the manner in which even the simplest capers would often run tragically awry, fifteen bizarre and often ironic tales are presented, including how a modern city rose to lynch a pair of kidnappers, the college kids who chose to imitate Leopold and Loeb, and the famed evangelist who faked her own abduction to cover up an affair. Early forensic techniques are described, including the first documented call tracing using a bevy of operators in a phone chain, as well as the birth of the modern symbiotic relationship between the news media and high-profile crime, demonstrating how the sensationalism of personal tragedy became a source for increased media sales.
Jim is also the author of San Francisco's Lost Landmarks, published in 2004.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

16 July 2010

Friday Report: 2010 Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research

This is Jeff Vaillant's final installment of his series from the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR). Thanks so much, Jeff!

Friday was the “short” day with three presentations. Those of us staying in the dorms had to be out before breakfast so the rooms could be cleaned for a new group arriving in the afternoon. Samford University hosts many activities: youth sport camps, freshman orientation, and church organizational meetings. The decibel level in the cafeteria must have been in excess of 80!

Lloyd started the day talking about Church Records. His bibliography included surveys and denominational records. He drove home the point that understanding the religion of an ancestor will help in finding records. Two tidbits offered were the 903 churches in 1750 (465 Congregational, 288 Anglican and about 250 Quaker meeting houses) and that a “graveyard” is associated with a church whereas a “cemetery” is not.

John Colletta revealed our ancestors using nineteenth-century newspapers. I heard a similar presentation from him in Santa Rosa a few years ago. If you have heard John speak, then you know he is both entertaining and informative. Again, an excellent outline and bibliography was offered. John cited St. Louis as an example of why newspapers are important in research. Of the fifteen papers in print there in 1904: six were in English with four for the white community, one for the black community and one for the Jewish community. There were five German newspapers, two Czech, one Polish and one Italian publication. The Library of Congress has a newspaper collection as well as many state archives and local archives. There are several websites with varying newspaper collections available—mostly on a fee basis.

The last session was Lloyd’s opportunity to finish his discussion of church records and other tidbits, for which there was little time earlier in the week. Yes, we all got handsome certificates of completion.

My take on IGHR is that I now understand why people keep coming to the Institute. One can spend an entire week on Virginia records or Military records or Scottish records.

The June 12-17, 2011 Course Offerings are:
  1. Techniques and Technology (Pamela Boyer Sayre)
  2. Intermediate Genealogy and Historical Studies (Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck)
  3. Research in the South, Part 3 (Carolyn Earle Billingsley)
  4. Advanced Methodology and Evidence Analysis (Elizabeth Shown Mills)
  5. Writing and Publishing for Genealogists (Thomas W. Jones)
  6. Advanced Library Research: Law Libraries and Government Documents (Ann Carter Fleming and Benjamin b. Spratling)
  7. Virginia's Land and Military Conflicts & Their Effect on Migration (Barbara Vines Little)
  8. Researching African-American Ancestors: Slave & Reconstruction Era Records (Frazine Taylor)
  9. U.S. Military Records (Christine Rose)
  10. Scottish Genealogical Research (Paul Milner)
I meet some splendid people while at the Institute. My next genealogical educational endeavor will be the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in Salt Lake City, Utah in January. So, it will be from the frying pan of Birmingham to the freezer of SLC.
– Jeffrey Vaillant

Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report


 Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

15 July 2010

Thursday Report: 2010 Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research

Jeffrey Vaillant continues his series from the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR).

Thursday was Bockstruck day! The definition of a walking encyclopedia is Lloyd.  His first presentation was on Hereditary Societies and Their Records. His bibliography included history, directories, military, armigerous (right to use of coat of arms), occupational, ethnic, colonial, old world societies and geographical references. He illustrated many of the lineage societies with his own family.

Next he covered the topic of Migrations or Westward Expansion in two separate presentations. One interesting set of facts about immigration that he offered was the number of arrivals.
  • 1620 – 1820:  650,000 people immigrated in 200 years
  • 1820 – 1880:  10,000,000 arrived over the next 60 years
  • 1880 – 1920:  25,000,000 in the next 40 years
Those are big numbers that stretch the brain to comprehend the impact made. A selfish thing that I found happening while listening was noting those references and aids which will help me in my own research. Most of the materials presented related to the Colonial period.

Lloyd finished the day talking about Special Collections. The points made were to survey the literature, become familiar with handbooks and guides to collections, stay current on genealogical literature, attend conferences, interact with other genealogists, and search computer data bases. Search the Family History Library catalogue, identify WPA inventories, use the NUCMC (National Union Catalog Manuscript Collection) and a touch of serendipity is useful too.

Thursday evening was the dinner banquet in the dining hall with Pamela Boyer Sayre talking about Lookin’ for Kinfolk, Dead or Alive. Hers was a light hearted presentation about field work and what might encounter.
– Jeffrey Vaillant

Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

14 July 2010

Wednesday Report: 2010 Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research

Jeffrey Vaillant continues his series from the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR).


The morning began with an excellent presentation by Christine Rose on Correlation and Analysis of Evidence. She began the talk with a discussion of the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS). She literally wrote the book on this subject. Rose spoke about the three classes of evidence which are (1) primary and secondary information, (2) direct and indirect evidence and (3) original and derivative sources.  Then she spoke to the importance of evaluating the three classes of evidence. If one becomes stuck, she suggested the following:
  • List all the documents located
  • Examine for any local, county, state and/or federal items not examined.
  • Abstract each document into a Word document, then use the FIND function to review names and locations
  • Watch for clues on religion
  • Watch for clues on inherited property

As an aside, Christine Rose will be presenting a one day seminar for the Sonoma County Genealogical Society in Santa Rosa on April 16, 2011. This may have been the best lecture of the week.

Onomatology was the title of Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck’s talk. That is a big title devoted to talking about names and everything and anything that can happen with the surname we are all researching.  And since word usage is big with Lloyd, on Monday I suggested “semi-posthumous child” for definition.  If I understood Lloyd and wrote it down correctly, that term is used to define a child who is left material goods by a grandfather when the father is dead!

Lloyd distributed an extensive bibliography (five pages single spaced) that included general works, forenames and diminutives, name changes (by state) and language dictionaries.  Another term to drop at the next genealogical society meeting is uxornecronyms—the name of the dead wife given to the child.

The afternoon was well spent with John Philip Colletta, Ph.D. who first spoke about Passenger Arrival Records from Colonial Times to Mid-twentieth Century. That is a lot of material which he supported with eight pages of outline and bibliography. I took away from this lecture his ideas on where to look if an ancestor arrives before 1820 – colonial period land patents and land grants, pre-federal naturalization, oaths of allegiance, lists of emigrants leaving, list of immigrants arriving, church records and complied histories.

Next the subject of Naturalization Records from Colonial Time to Early Twentieth Century was presented and supported by six pages of outline and bibliography.  My take away was the reminder that naturalization records are kept by the regional NARA depositories not in Washington, DC and to check with a state’s archives. The other piece of information I took was the specific legislation that allowed foreign born to gain citizenship from fighting in the Civil War.  That citation is to Chapter XXV, Thirty Seventh Congress, Session II, Chapter 75, 1862 which one can find by looking up the congressional records.  This sent me to the Library right after class to do so!  If you are not interested, skip this next section.

Act of July 17, 1862:  Honorably Discharged Soldiers (Re: Naturalization):
“Section 2166:  Any alien, of the age of twenty-one years and upward, who has enlisted, or may enlist, in the armies of the United States, either the regular or the volunteer forces, and has been , or may be hereafter, honorably discharged, shall be admitted to become a citizen of the United States, upon his petition, without any previous declaration of his intention to become such; and he shall not be required to prove more that on year’s residence within the United States previous to his application to become such citizen; and the court admitting such alien shall, in additions to proof of residence and good character, as now provided by law, be satisfied by competent proof of such person’s having been honorably discharged from the service of the United States.”

On Tuesday the question was: What President lost his citizenship and did not regain it?  The answer is: John Tyler – who was a strong states rights person and who lived in Virginia at the time of secession.  As a person living in Virginia he lost his citizenship AND he died before the end of the Civil War.

Wednesday evening Patricia Walls Stamm presented The Timeline: Linking Historical Events to Our Family History. She urged the use of a person’s life events with readily available timelines. Some genealogy software has this capacity. I know I have found timelines to be a big help in identifying where to look for more information about an ancestor.
– Jeffrey Vaillant

Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report


 Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

13 July 2010

Tuesday Report: 2010 Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research

Jeffrey Vaillant continues his series from the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR).

Tuesday morning was filled with Court Records presented by Christine Rose, CG, CGL, FASG – one of our many local (San Jose) gems. Part I of the presentation was The System and Its Records; Part II was on Estates. Like Lloyd and Claire, Christine prepared in advance very complete documentations supporting the presentation. What I gather is clues for my research. For example, we mainly think about court records being at the local level; however, I learned that is not the case for North Carolina. Those records are in the state archives. (Yes, after each class I have been visiting the library to do research on the items learned.) And courts issue licenses for ordinaries. An ordinary is what we might call a public inn. So did my ggg grandfather Charles Fuller get a license from the court before opening his inn in Jeffersonville, Indiana in the early 1820s? I do not know and will find out if there is a record to be found.

The afternoon was devoted to Military and Pension Records from the Revolutionary War through World War II. A big time span and with the prepared materials we are left with much research to do. I picked up several ideas about looking for NARA records for the War of 1812 which is one of my interests and research challenges. Lloyd knows his records and we sit spellbound as he relates to us his knowledge. A tidbit is what U. S. President lost his citizenship? Answer later in the week.

The Tuesday evening session was Certification: Procedures, Questions and Answers presented by Elissa Powell and Thomas Jones. For me this was one of those recharge the batteries as I continue to have a goal of certification.

Other stuff: The weather continues to be about 100°F with humidity of 90% each day. It rained briefly Monday and today which temporarily reduced the humidity for about 60 minutes.

The University Center Cafeteria does an excellent job feeding what must be 1500 people per meal. Yes, the lines are long and one does learn short cuts.

Samford University has about 2700 undergraduates and about the same number of graduate students. It is an all brick campus set on gentle hills.
– Jeffrey Vaillant

Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

12 July 2010

Monday Report: 2010 Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research

Jeffrey Vaillant continues his series from the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR).

Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck began the morning by stating the “simple” Four Steps of Genealogical Research:
  1. What do you want to find or to prove?
  2. What kind of record would contain that information?
  3. Where does that record exist?
  4. How do I gain access to it?
This four step process strikes me as a good guideline for the week. The first presentation was on Tax Records. Lloyd provided a bibliography of tax record sources that have been complied for many (but not all) states. He addressed remembering to know what the law required for taxing. And in the colonial period there were rent rolls rather than tax rolls in places like Virginia (paid to Lord Fairfax), Maryland (paid to Lord Baltimore), Pennsylvania (paid to William Penn) and North Carolina (paid to Lord Granville).

Next Lloyd discussed the Pitfalls of Genealogy with a list of some twenty-eight examples! Some we all know about: surnames and forenames, Sr. versus Jr., as well as abbreviations and titles. Some people get tripped up on the sanctity of the printed word or the failure to become acquainted with local history. Ever hear the term “semi-posthumous child”? I certainly had not. Want to guess what it means? I will answer in a couple of days.

Claire Bettag, CG, CGL, presented the afternoon lecture on Federal Land Records at the National Archives. If you have heard Claire, then you will know it is impossible to nap after lunch when she is presenting. She ripped through her ten pages of prepared materials leaving behind many items for follow up. Upon my return I'll be visiting NARA in San Bruno to follow up on several sources she cited.

Lloyd finished the afternoon with A Genealogical Bibliography divided into subjects of Atlases/Gazetteers, Bibliographies, Biography, Dictionaries, Handbooks, Indexes, Law, Paleography, Passenger Lists, Periodicals, Manuscripts, and Ethnic Guides.

There are optional evening presentations offered. Monday night was excellent. Ruth Ann (Abels) Hager spoke on History through Genealogy—the Best of Both Worlds. She presented what would be called a case study on Dred and Harriet Scott: Their Family History. Yes, this is the Dred Scott of the U.S. Supreme Court decision. One might think that about all has been written and discovered about the family. Well, one would be wrong. Ruth has uncovered new materials and explained how using genealogical methodology led to the discoveries and their information. Her book was published this year and is now in my collection.
– Jeffrey Vaillant

Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

11 July 2010

Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days


Board member and conference reporter, Jeffrey Vaillant, has been on another voyage of learning. This time he took time out of a busy week in Birmingham, Alabama to report on the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR). Jeff's first report:

IGHR is the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research held annually at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. There are ten courses offered this year and I selected Intermediate Genealogy and Historical Studies whose course coordinator is Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck.

My trip to “genealogy camp” (as some call it) began innocently enough with a United Airlines flight from the San Francisco Bay Area to Birmingham with a stopover in Chicago – all on the Saturday before the institute to allow me to arrive a bit early. The travel time would allow me to read Virginia Winters’ book Murderous Roots (2009) which I highly recommend for mystery readers with a strong genealogical bent.

Landing at O’Hare International Airport brought the sudden news that my connecting flight to Birmingham had been cancelled. The agent at the gate informed me that the chances of getting out of Chicago were slim and to proceed to the customer service desk which he warned me would have a long line. How right he was. After waiting 2.5 hours in line I finally got to talk with a service person. No flights on any airline out of O’Hare Saturday night. What were my options? ALL the flights on Sunday were booked! To his credit the service person put me on a standby list for the 7 a.m. flight and if that did not work out he ticketed me from Chicago to Charleston, SC, to Charlotte, NC and then to Birmingham. Since the flight cancellation was weather related I got a discounted rate at the Doubletree in Rosemont and was assured that my luggage would be on the first flight out the next morning (which was my standby flight).

Up early Sunday morning, shuttle to the airport and Starbucks was my start of the the day. I found that watching the wonderfully informative screens at the gate kept me informed about the flight, including the standby list. I was number eleven and there were ten seats left. “Standbys” were encouraged to stay until the gate closed. I had an alternative so I waited it out. Four seats left and I am number seven on the list. WHAT?? My name was called and I was on the plane.

It was a short flight to Birmingham – one hour, forty five minutes – arriving before 9:00 a.m. Off to retrieve the luggage. The routing is well known. We all stand around staring at the conveyor belt which finally starts. Nope, the luggage did not arrive! Where is the luggage agent? The luggage office was closed so it was off to see a ticket agent. The luggage tag and the computer system worked well: the luggage was still in Chicago! The United Airlines Delayed Baggage Report was filled out and submitted. The assurance was I would hear within 24 hours. Well, that was not going to work since I was staying in the dorms and the luggage contained bedding materials and the like.

Since orientation was in the afternoon and it was hot in Birmingham (99°F.) I elected to stay in the airport and read Labor Day by Joyce Maynard on my Kindle. Afternoon arrived so it was time to taxi from the airport to Samford University ($45). It was amazing to see others standing around in the heat and humidity waiting to register – and the line got quite long before the doors opened. Registration was a snap due to the IGHR staff. I got my dorm room. Bare bones accommodations and the price is right.

Dinner was in the Cafeteria with more than the 300 attending IGHR. The campus is alive with various activities from summer youth sports camps to freshman orientation. The cafeteria staff must have feed 1500 people. The IGHR orientation followed. The orientation was complete and informative. I called United Airlines to find out the status on my luggage. Their call center could not find anyone at the Birmingham Airport---not surprise it being Sunday.

One advantage about conferences and institutes is the people who attend. I was able to hitch a ride to Kmart to get clean clothes and some bathing items as well as rent a room at the nearby Marriott for the night. At 11:30 p.m. my luggage arrived so Monday I could get settled into the dorm.

Ah, what an adventure. I knew I should have flown Southwest Airlines.
– Jeffrey Vaillant



Read the entire series:
Part 1 — Getting to IGHR: A Tale of Two Days
Part 2 — Monday Report
Part 3 — Tuesday Report
Part 4 — Wednesday Report
Part 5 — Thursday Report
Part 6 — Friday Report



Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

10 July 2010

Third Edition: Carnival of Genealogical Societies

Welcome to the Third Edition of the Carnival of Genealogical Societies.

First, kudos to the footnoteMaven for creating the carnival badge and description:



The key to all good genealogical research starts with the society of other genealogists and in turn genealogy societies.
Next, I must apologize for my tardiness and the lack of time and attention I have given to the GenSo Carnival. I promise to do a better job of promoting the carnival and gathering submissions starting with the next edition.

The topic for this edition is: Uniquely Us!
How is your society unique?
Tell us about something one-of-a-kind. Is it a program, project, or publication? A record set or archival holding? A certain procedure or way you handle meetings? This is your opportunity to tell why and how your society is special!

This edition has three submissions:

Thomas MacEntee is the new Publicity Chair and the social media agent for the Illinois State Genealogical Society based in Springfield, Illinois. Thomas describes some of the special genealogy programs and services available at the society in Uniquely Illinois posted at Illinois State Genealogical Society Blog.

Charles Hansen shares a special type of city directory resource in  Third Carnival Of Genealogical Societies: Uniquely EWGS posted at Eastern Washington Genealogical Society Blog. Charles commented: "I don't know how EWGS got these Postal Forwarding books, but as a resource for genealogists they are amazing."

Kathryn Doyle discusses a valuable CGS database in Uniquely Ours: The California Names Index posted here at the California Genealogical Society and Library blog. "Take a chance and search our index!"


This concludes the third edition.

The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogical Societies originated with a request from Robert Larson, President and Newsletter Editor of the Larimer County Genealogical Society. The society recently put up a Facebook Page and Bob had some questions that are timely.

Call for Submissions!
The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogical Societies is: Gen Societies on Facebook.
Does your society have a Facebook Page? What are the benefits? Are you an administrator or a regular contributor? Does it help your members or attract new visitors and members?

The deadline for submissions is September 7, 2010.

Please indicate in your article that you are writing for the Fourth Edition of the Carnival of Genealogical Societies. Submit your blog post using the carnival submission form provided by Blog Carnival. Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any article you plan to submit and write a brief introduction to your articles in the "remarks" section of the form.

Past posts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

See you at the Carnival!



 Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

08 July 2010

Uniquely Ours: The California Names Index

Member volunteers have donated thousands of hours painstakingly indexing and abstracting records held by the society to create the California Names Index – an enormous and unique database on our website. Currently there are more than 350,000 names in the index from state, county, and local references. It is an ongoing project and names are added regularly.

Surname searches of the index are free. Search results yield a full name and an Index Code which identifies the type of source material we have for that individual. If your ancestors or relatives appear in the Names Index, you can order copies of the original records from our Lookups Committee. (Members receive a discount for this service.)

Are you missing a nineteenth century ancestor? During the Gold Rush years, the population of a place called California exploded as immigrants poured into the territory from around the world. Take a chance and search the California Names Index. Be sure to leave a comment if you get a hit!

–Written for the Third Edition of the Carnival of Genealogical Societies: Uniquely Us.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library.

07 July 2010

Workshop: Using Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 for Your Genealogy Presentations

Saturday, August 7, 2010
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

California Genealogical Society Library
2201 Broadway, Suite LL2
Oakland, California 94612

PowerPoint 2007 is a powerful presentation tool that allows you to create professional looking presentations and have fun doing it!

In this workshop, Kathy Watson will show you how to:
  • navigate around the ribbon and know where things are located
  • create and save presentations
  • work with tabs and tools to insert elements and style them as you want
  • choose a theme
and more!

You will get hands-on practice by working on some instructor-created exercises. If you don't bring your laptop to class you can partner with someone and try the exercises at home.

Skill level: beginner to intermediate.

This workshop is limited to fifteen participants and one of the free benefits for CGS members. Non-members fee is $20.00 (non-refundable) and can be applied towards membership on the day of the workshop.

Preregistration is required. Walk-ins will not be admitted.

Register online.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

05 July 2010

Update From the French-Canadian Special Interest Group

One of the upcoming summer Thursday night discussions will be devoted to all thing French-Canadian.

On Thursday, July 22, 2010, Mary Beth Frederick will facilitate a discussion about French-Canadian research resources. She will be available to provide help for non-French-speakers about commonly used words and to converse about the format of French-Canadian birth, marriage and death records. Attendees are encouraged to bring their problem documents.

The session will be held from 6:30 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. at the CGS library. Participants of all levels of research experience are welcome to network and join the conversation.

SIG organizer Lorna Jones sent word that future meetings of the French-Canadian group are planned for Saturday mornings: October 9, 2010 and January 8, 2011.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

02 July 2010

Workshop: How to Conduct Oral Histories with Nancy Thompson

Saturday, August 14, 2010
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

California Genealogical Society and Library
2201 Broadway, Suite LL2
Oakland, California 94612

Nancy Thompson will conduct a three-hour interactive workshop on how to conduct oral histories. Discussion topics will include interviewing techniques, transcribing and editing tips, using photographs and other family memorabilia, incorporating relevant social history, using different multimedia options (book, CD, video, DVD, websites), and archiving oral histories.

This workshop is limited to thirty participants and is a free benefit of membership. A non-refundable fee of  $20.00 will be charged to non-members (can be applied towards a CGS membership only on the day of the workshop.) Walk-ins will not be admitted. Preregistration is required.

Register online.

Nancy Thompson is an Oakland native, an award-winning oral historian, filmmaker, and writer. She is the director and producer of a 12-minute documentary titled Mrs. Brown’s Beauty - A Story of Art and Inspiration. Produced in 2006, the film has been screened at film festivals in Oakland, San Francisco, and Atlanta. She is the author of Pioneering Spirits – A Legacy of Courage (2009), The Life and Art of Inez Brown (2009), The Artwork of Inez Brown (2005), and The Turner Family History (2003). Nancy was an interviewer for the Friends of Negro Spirituals Oral History Project, In Our Own Words: The Negro Spirituals Heritage Keepers and she has recorded her family history with the Story Corps’ Griot Project and the Museum of the African Diaspora’s Share Your Stories Project. Nancy earned a B.A. degree in sociology/economics from Mills College in Oakland and a J.D. degree from Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco.


Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library

01 July 2010

eNews July 2010, volume 4, number 7

The July 2010 issue of the eNews, volume 4, number 7, has been published and emailed to members and friends. As always, the eNews features timely information about the California Genealogical Society and our upcoming events. Each edition also includes Suggested Links From the Blogosphere and a photo feature: California Ancestors.

This month I submitted one of my own ancestor photographs. A tintype of my gg-grandmother, Mary Ann "Mollie" Glant Briggs.

Mary Ann "Mollie" (Glant) Briggs (1848-1880)

All past issues of the eNews are available for viewing at the eNewsARCHIVE.

The August 2010 issue will be emailed on July 31, 2010. To receive a copy, please join our mailing list.

Copyright © 2010 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library