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13 February 2012

Getting Ready for the 1940 Census with Steve Morse

Saturday, March 24, 2012
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

California Genealogical Society Library
2201 Broadway, Suite LL2
Oakland, CA 94612

CGS is pleased to be welcoming back Steve Morse who will be helping us get ready for the soon-to-be-released 1940 census. When it is released in April, the 1940 will not have a name index and it is estimated it will take up to six months for a name index to be available. Finding people in the census will involve searching by location using Enumeration Districts (EDs).

Morse's One-Step website contains numerous tools for obtaining EDs. His talk will present the various tools and show circumstances in which each can be used. Steve will also demonstrate a tutorial quiz for determining the best tool to use in each specific situation.

Immediately following Morse's presentation, past-president Steve Harris will facilitate an open forum on using U.S. Census Records.

Register online.

The class is limited to thirty participants and is a free benefit of membership. Non-members fee is $20.00 (non-refundable) and can be applied towards membership on the day of the class.

Preregistration is required. Walk-ins will not be admitted. Registration confirmations will be sent to the first thirty registrants. Additional names will be collected and placed on a waiting list in case of cancellations.

Stephen Morse is the creator of the One-Step Website for which he has received both the Lifetime Achievement Award and the Outstanding Contribution Award from the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, Award of Merit from the National Genealogical Society, first-ever Excellence Award from the Association of Professional Genealogists, and two awards that he cannot pronounce from Polish genealogical societies.

In his other life Morse is a computer professional with a doctorate degree in electrical engineering. He has held various research, development, and teaching positions, authored numerous technical papers, written four textbooks, and holds four patents. He is best known as the architect of the Intel 8086 (the granddaddy of today's Pentium processor), which sparked the PC revolution thirty years ago.

Copyright © 2012 by Kathryn M. Doyle, California Genealogical Society and Library